Tax Articles and Updates

2022 Estimated Tax Payments Overview

by IRS calendar June 13th, 2022     |     Share   

June 13, 2022

What taxpayers need to know about making 2022 estimated tax payments

By law, everyone must pay tax as they earn income. Generally taxpayers must pay at least 90 percent of their taxes throughout the year through withholding, estimated or additional tax payments or a combination of the two. If they don’t, they may owe an estimated tax penalty when they file. Some taxpayers earn income not subject to withholding. For small business owners and self-employed people, that usually means making quarterly estimated tax payments.

Here are some key things to help taxpayers determine if they need to make estimated tax payments:

  • Generally, taxpayers need to make estimated tax payments if they expect to owe $1,000 or more when they file their 2022 tax return, after adjusting for any withholding.
  • The IRS urges anyone in this situation to check their withholding using the Tax Withholding Estimator on IRS.gov. If the estimator suggests a change, the taxpayer can submit a new Form W-4  to their employer.
  • Aside from business owners and self-employed individuals, people who need to make estimated payments also include sole proprietors, partners and S corporation shareholders. It also often includes people involved in the sharing economy.
  • Corporations generally must make these payments if they expect to owe $500 or more on their 2022 tax return.
  • Aside from income tax, taxpayers can pay other taxes through estimated tax payments. This includes self-employment tax and the alternative minimum tax.
  • The remaining deadlines for paying 2022 quarterly estimated tax are: June 15, Sept. 15, and Jan. 17, 2023.
  • Taxpayers can check out these forms for details on how to figure their payments:
  • Taxpayers can visit IRS.gov to find options for paying estimated taxes. These include:

Anyone who pays too little tax through withholding, estimated tax payments, or a combination of the two may owe a penalty. In some cases, the penalty may apply if their estimated tax payments are late. The penalty may apply even if the taxpayer is due a refund.

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